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CHAPTER 3

The Earliest Products

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By Margaret Gurowitz
Jul 13, 2006

Aseptic Gauze and Cotton Products

Aseptic gauze and cotton were among the first Johnson & Johnson products.  Many of these early products were impregnated with antiseptic agents or medication, and sealed in glass or metal containers to keep them sterile. These antiseptic gauzes and cottons helped revolutionize surgical care by greatly reducing mortality rates from surgical infection.  Many of the names of the Company’s early products, such as the ones above, were descriptive of the product or its ingredients.  Others -- such as Dr. Grosvenor’s Bellcapsic Plaster -- were named after physicians who contributed ideas for new products to the Company. 

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Alecm
OCTOBER 24, 2006 11:19 AM

The insight into early product history is fascinating; can you say whether you'll be tracking product history up to the modern era?

Some of us trivia buffs would actually be quite interested in "history of the band-aid" from then to now, including adhesive changes, movement from (presumably) fabric to plastic backing, and so forth...

Thanks!

Sharon Makarski
JULY 04, 2007 04:54 PM

I have an old dental floss holder that has Johnson Brothers on it. It is clear glass with a stainless steel top. I am interested in finding out when it was used by johnson brothers

Margaret
JULY 11, 2007 10:22 AM

Sharon,

Johnson & Johnson started manufacturing dental floss in small glass containers with metal tops in 1916. So your dental floss container is from 1916-1920s (So far, I don't have a specific ending date for the glass container packaging.)

Faye Zuckerman
AUGUST 13, 2007 05:33 PM

Can you tell me who invented the packaging for the band aid box? Why sell them in tin boxes? Who thought up the packaging design? Were they always packaged that way? Did Johnson and Johnson know that folks would collect the tin flip-top band aid boxes?

Margaret
AUGUST 14, 2007 12:10 PM

The first BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandages came onto the market in 1921, and were sold in a flat, square cardboard box. In 1926, they were first packaged in tins. During World War II, due to wartime conservation, we went back to cardboard packaging for a few years. The Company continued with the metal tins until we switched to cardboard in the 1990s. Earle Dickson, a cotton buyer for Johnson & Johnson, invented the BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandage in 1920 to help his wife, who cut herself frequently in the kitchen and needed a ready-made bandage she could apply herself. We don’t have a record of who came up with the packaging design, but historically, many products (JOHNSON’S® Baby Powder, dental floss, medicated plasters) were packaged in tins, many of which were beautifully decorated. The people at Johnson & Johnson didn’t know the tins would become collectible, but they were sturdy and easy to re-use, so they became part of people’s homes and workshops.

Richard Moore
APRIL 13, 2009 06:23 PM

I have a collection of over 400 different band-aid tins. One of my favorites is a Johnson & Johnson tin that is only one-third the height of a normal band-aid tin. It looks like the vertical part of the tin was cut in thirds (complete with chopped off graphics), and the top and bottom applied to them, making three tins out of what was intended to be one. A friend of mine told me that J&J did that during war time to save money. It's a neat story, but I wonder if it is really true. If it is true, I haven't found the middle and bottom thirds used yet.

Margaret
APRIL 14, 2009 02:23 PM

Richard,

Over 400 tins -- that's a fabulous collection! The BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandages tin with chopped off graphics that you described sounds interesting, but doesn't sound like something that Johnson & Johnson would have produced, since we were always very careful about properly displaying the product's complete name and graphics on the packaging. Throughout the BAND-AID® Brand's history, the tins have come in a variety of shapes and sizes. The first ones starting in 1921 were flat and square, and later some were round like canisters. During World War II Johnson & Johnson didn't cut down existing tins but in 1943 went temporarily to cardboard packaging for BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandages. This was due to shortages of material to make the tins because of the war effort. If you send me a picture of the tin, I would be happy to take a look at it. You can find a link to email me on the blog's "About the Author" page.

Margaret

Richard Moore
APRIL 24, 2009 03:44 PM

Hello Margaret,
I recently posted a comment/question about an old, short Band-Aid tin. You asked me to send you a picture of the particular tin in question, which I did. However, after three tries on your e-mail address, it still fails. How can I e-mail you??
Richard

Margaret
APRIL 24, 2009 04:09 PM

Hi Richard,

Sorry about the e-mail. I thought I had gotten that fixed... If the Kilmer House mailbox isn't working, you can try my other e-mail address: mgurowi@its.jnj.com. I will also try to e-mail you and if you reply to that and include the photo, that should work.

Margaret

Roy
MAY 05, 2009 12:00 AM

i have an alumminum tin measuring 3.5" x 2" x3/4" thick,it is engraved with,,,,Wood's ligature,,,,johnson @ johnson New brunswick,New Jersey.can you give me any info on this item,thank you

Margaret
MAY 05, 2009 11:09 AM

Hi Roy,

What you have is a package that would have contained glass vials of sterile ligatures used to close incisions in surgery. Woods Ligatures first appeared in our price list in 1905, and were packaged in solution in sealed glass vials to keep them sterile. The vials were then packaged in an outer container. Glass vials of Woods Ligatures are pictured in some of our early price lists packaged 12 to a box. The box was usually depicted as cardboard, so yours is a variant with sturdier outer packaging. For instance, many of our wartime medical products during World War I were packaged that way and it's likely that your tin may be a wartime product. Without any more information or a picture of your tin, it's hard to be more precise.

Hope that proves helpful,

Margaret

William Berg
SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 04:59 PM

Margaret -
I am a retired 26 year employee of J&J who has an extensive collection of J&J antique medical products.
Is there a web site or contact where I can locate information on some of the many products I have acquired?
If any of my collection is truly rare, could I some day donate items to J&J to fill out their collection?
Here are some of the items which may be rare. I can attach photos to interested parties.
* Papoid Therapeutical Notes on the use of PAPOID
* Belladona Plaster tin sold by Johnson & Johnson Operative Chemists New York
* Carton of 1 pound of Johnson & Johnson OAKUM
* Flat tin of Listers Tooth Soap
* Bottles Of Johnson & Johnson Lime Water, Boric Acid ,Olive Oil and Castor Oil
* Silk Ligatures Carbolized Twisted Assorted Sizes (on 3 spools in a single bottle)
* Sulphur Fumigators carton of 6

Plus many other J&J items.
I also have a collection of Seabury's and Seabury's/Johnson antique products.

William Berg

Margaret
SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 05:22 PM

In reply to by William Berg

William,

Wow -- it certainly sounds as if you have a great collection! Not only Johnson & Johnson products, but Seabury & Johnson as well! If you are interested in more information about your products, I will be happy to provide it. And if you would like someday to donate products to our archives and museum, we would gladly accept the donation. I will look up the products you mentioned in your email and email you more information on them. You can also email me either through the blog (the email link is on the About the Author page) or at mgurowi@its.jnj.com

Margaret

Julie Cooper
OCTOBER 21, 2009 10:19 PM

i have a johnson and johnson first aid kit no. 20 wooden box in great condition
it says wartime container made in the usa
inside it has tongue depresors by johnson and johnson
metaphen by johnson and johnson
guaze bandage and red cross bandages
aromatic spirit of ammonia
esmarch triangular bandage
polysporin
poison ivy wash
muslin finger cots
i have no idea as to value of this item, was thinking about running it on ebay
any help would be appreciated, as i can not find anything like it on line to get a true idea of value

Margaret
OCTOBER 22, 2009 05:25 PM

Hi Julie,

Without seeing pictures of the first aid kit and its contents I can't give you a date. The fact that it's a First Aid Kit No. 20 in a wooden box with an Esmarch Triangular Bandage would lead me to think it could potentially be an older wartime first aid kit, but you mentioned it contains Polysporin, which was not on the market until the 1970s, according to information I've seen. Where did you find the first aid kit? Is it possible that some of the contents are not original and were added later? Would you be able to email me some photographs of the kit through the blog's email? You can find the link to the email on the "About the Author" page of the blog.

Thanks,

Margaret

Mark Stewart
NOVEMBER 18, 2009 09:52 AM

Hi Margaret,
I have found a J&J first aid kit for sale, it is a No. 16 kit. Is this kit from the 1930's?
Thanks
Mark
908-246-0585

Margaret
NOVEMBER 18, 2009 12:24 PM

Mark,

We did make the No. 16 First Aid kits during the 1930s, so your kit is most likely from that era. They first appeared in our price list in 1935, and had bandages, gauze, cotton, Drybak adhesive plaster, a bottle of spirits of ammonia, scissors, First Aid Manual, Drybak BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandages and paper cups, among other supplies. Without seeing a picture of your First Aid Kit, it's hard to tell, but it's probably a 1930s First Aid Kit.

Margaret

Mark Stewart
NOVEMBER 19, 2009 09:06 PM

Thanks Margaret...Would you please look at the photo of the kit on the following site and give me your opinion as to its authenticity.
Thanks
Mark
http://www.rubylane.com/shops/fallsavenue/item/RL915

Margaret
NOVEMBER 20, 2009 11:31 AM

Mark,

It looks like a nice kit. That is definitely the No. 16 First Aid kit from the 1930s, with most of the contents. Johnson & Johnson sold replacement contents for all of its First Aid Kits, and people bought replacement supplies as they used up the old ones over time. They would keep the metal kit and just replace supplies as needed. That would explain, for instance, the more recent bandages in an older metal kit.

Margaret

Mark Stewart
NOVEMBER 20, 2009 11:59 AM

Hi Margaret,
I am learning more about J&J kits than I thought I would ever want to know. I am trying to find a kit that was supplied with my 1936 airplane. Few people, if any now, know what the kit was, but one document I just found said it was a J&J kit. No kit number was listed, but it thought to be a tin kit measuring about 6" by 4" by 2" high. Do you have a listing of 1930 kits made by J&J that would list the size of the tin box? That might help me narrow down the search for something that would be close.
Thanks
Mark

Margaret
NOVEMBER 20, 2009 02:28 PM

Hi Mark,

It sounds like your original kit may have been an Aerokit, which was a Johnson & Johnson First Aid Kit that was manufactured starting in the early 1930s. Our price lists don't include the dimensions of the kit, but we have an Aerokit in our museum and it's around the right size. They were smaller kits designed for airplanes, and the early Aerokits were black metal containers with gold lettering. The contents included: two muslin bandages, Drybak Adhesive Plaster, two ampoules of spirits of ammonia, a pair of scissors, A First Aid Manual, a burn dressing backet, a tourniquet, six Drybak BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandages and two paper drinking cups.

Best of luck on your search!

Margaret

Mark Stewart
NOVEMBER 23, 2009 09:51 AM

Wow! Margaret that is great info. Would you know where I might be able to aquire an Aerokit?
Thanks so much,
Mark

Margaret
NOVEMBER 23, 2009 11:14 AM

Mark,

Your best bet would be to keep checking auction sites like eBay (I have seen them occasionally come up there), or antique dealers -- especially if there are any who deal with aviation-related items, or medical/consumer products. Also, if there are any sites on which you could post an inquiry (vintage Johnson & Johnson Aerokit First Aid Kit from the 1930s wanted), that would probably be helpful too. If you know any antique dealers or antique stores, you could probably also ask them to keep a look out for an Aerokit for you.

Best of luck!

Margaret

Mark Stewart
NOVEMBER 24, 2009 09:53 AM

Hi Margaret,
Thanks for the advise and to help in my search, would you please send me a copy of any literature or information you have detailing the 1930's Aerokit. Any advertisements for the kit?
Thanks
Mark
stewartmw@aol.com

Sue Foell
DECEMBER 27, 2009 02:21 PM

I have a poster for a product called 'Zon Weiss' toothpowder that was manufactured by J&J. I would love to find a box to match my print.

Thank you,

Sue

Margaret
JANUARY 04, 2010 11:09 AM

Hi Sue,

Sorry I took so long to get back to you on this: even bloggers sometimes take a vacation during the holiday season! Zonweiss was one of our earliest products (first appeared in our 1887 price list) and the name means "white teeth" in German. The Zonweiss ads were very beautiful -- with hand-drawn illustrations from Gulliver's Travels, fairy tales and mythology. You're very fortunate to have a poster of one of the ads! The actual product first appeared in small glass jars as a tooth powder. The jars came with a little spoon to use to put the powder on your toothbrush. The product later moved to collapsible tubes, like modern toothpaste -- it was one of the first to do so. Your best bet would be to keep checking antique stores (especially the ones that carry old products or ephemera) and online auction sites like eBay. Here's more information on Zonweiss and its ads, if you're interested: http://www.kilmerhouse.com/?p=59

This one is about the Zonweiss ads: http://www.kilmerhouse.com/?p=177

Best of luck in your search!

Margaret

Gary
MARCH 02, 2010 04:41 AM

I am curious about a small tin that held dental floss. The tin is about an inch & a quarter tall, and roughly an inch in diameter.

DENTOTAPE
Flat Dental Floss
(KETON)
Johnson & Johnson

red, & blue ink over a bone or cream color.

--Gary--

Margaret
MARCH 02, 2010 05:47 PM

Hi Gary,

DENTOTAPE® was (and is) a wider, flat variety of dental floss that was introduced circa 1950. Without seeing a picture of your tin, it's hard to be exact as to the date. Although Johnson & Johnson didn't invent dental floss, we were the first to mass produce it over 100 years ago to make it affordable for people to use. It was generally sold in small tins like the one you have. Consumers could afford to buy a small tin of dental floss or DENTOTAPE® and take it home and try it. Originally, it was made from leftover suture silk. The old tins like the one you have used the same basic mechanism as do dental floss and DENTOTAPE® containers today: the floss was wound around a spool, with a metal cutter on the package so consumers could easily cut off the length they needed. Additionally, Johnson & Johnson included information on oral care and hygiene in its early public health materials in order to educate people on proper care of the mouth.

Margaret

Margaret
MARCH 08, 2010 10:30 AM

Gary,

That would be great and very helpful in further identifying your tin. You can email the picture to the blog's mailbox -- there's a link on the "About the Author" page.

Thanks!

Margaret

Celia Rosey
MARCH 09, 2010 01:10 PM

Hi Im doing Duct tape for National History Day and need some primary sources by this friday. If you have any information it would be greatly apreciated. Thanks

Margaret
MARCH 09, 2010 01:16 PM

Hi Celia,

Here's the post on duct tape and its invention: http://www.kilmerhouse.com/?p=956

Since duct tape was invented as a wartime product, and since the operating company that made duct tape hasn't been a part of the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies since 1982, we don't have any more primary sources or information on it than what you see in the post. But please feel free to use the information in the post as you do your National History Day project -- and best of luck on the project!

Margaret

Lee
MARCH 15, 2010 05:48 PM

Hello. I was just doing a search for a band-aid box I have and found this site. I am hoping someone can tell me the age. I looked at the timeline someone posted above and the box resembles the first picture. The box is black cardboard with a goldish label on the front. the labels says the box contained 6 strios 3/4 inch wide and 3 pieces, 3 1/2 inches long. Also has a price of 25 cents and says Pat. Applied For. Any help in identifying the age would be appreciated as I haven't been able to find a picture of this box online.

Margaret
MARCH 17, 2010 05:34 PM

Lee,

I will do some checking in our archives and post what I find out in the comments. If your box is cardboard, it's a very early one. Do you know if your box is a U.S. BAND-AID Brand Adhesive Bandage box, or from outside of the U.S.?

Margaret

Lee
MARCH 18, 2010 09:45 AM

Thank You so much for your reply. On the gold sticker, at the bottom of the box, in red capital letters is had MADE IN U.S.A. The box itself measures about 4" x 3.5". width is a little over 1/2". I made some pictures but I haven't been able to download them yet. I can see a stamp on the inside of the box that has 6 19 B 757. The outside has the same look as the first picture on the band-aid timeline but the sticker is not the same.

Rod Roach
APRIL 03, 2010 09:43 AM

Hello, I have been trying to find some information on a metal box I have, and am having little luck. It is black, 7in. wide 5in. tall 3in. deep. In gold letters says 6 first aid for wounds packets do not break seal unless accident occurs Johnson & Johnson New Brunswick N.J. With a small red cross on the bottom on each side of the company name. It also has a metal triangle attached to the back to hang it up. I would greatly appreciate any help in figuring out a little history on this. Thanks alot, Rod

Pier
APRIL 12, 2010 04:33 AM

Hi,

I'm a italian boy interested to the recently innovation of Jhonson & Jhonson pharmaceutic brand, particuraly I'm interested to product from 1999 to 2004.
Can someone tell me some sites where I can fine useful information about it?

Margaret
APRIL 13, 2010 12:36 PM

Hi Pier,

I don't know how much information there will be on products from 1999 to 2004 specifically, but the link below is a good place to start. It has links to specific sites for our major prescription products:

http://www.jnj.com/connect/healthcare-products/prescription/?flash=true

Margaret

Lee
APRIL 19, 2010 10:40 AM

Hello Margaret,
I sent some pictures to you of the cardboard band-aid box. Do you have anything in the archives that would give me an idea of the age of the box?

Thanks,
Lee

Emma
APRIL 23, 2010 08:56 AM

Ok everyone has really cool interesting stories to post but mine is just a query, I'm doing a marketing mix on the all time iconic Baby powder but there is a distinct lack of information on the pricing of this product through out its life span meaning I can't rely complete my project, I was just wondering is there an alterntive site or somewhere that i can gain access to the information I need?

Please and Thanks,
Emma

Margaret
APRIL 26, 2010 09:40 AM

Hi Emma,

We don't talk about pricing of our products, so that is why there's no information on historical pricing of JOHNSON'S® Baby Powder on the blog or on the brand website: http://johnsonsbaby.com/index.do

Sorry we couldn't be of more help!

Best Regards,

Margaret

Arthur Neighbor
APRIL 29, 2010 07:18 PM

Have a J&J First Aid Kit (formerly household) #20, empty/metal box. Contents listing inside is as follows:
2 Gauze Bandages 1", 2 Gauze Bandages 1-1/2", 2 Gauze Bandages 2", 6 Steri- Pads 3"x3", 1 Adhesive 1/2" x 5 yards, 1 antiseptic 1/2 oz, 1 Aromatic Ammonia 1/2 oz, 1 First Aid Guide, 36 Band Aid Adhesive Bandages (Assorted Sizes), 1 Burn Ointment 1-1/4 oz, 1 Analgesic Balm 1-1/4 oz, 1 Triangular Bandage, 1 Absorbant Cotton 1/2 oz, 12 Tongue Depressors.
I'm guessing this might be possible pre WWII, likely WWII, Mid War, Post War, and or possible early 1950s ??? from descriptives and answers posted to date. Help Appreciated. Box size is 7-1/4" wide, 9-14" long, 2-3/8" deep w/bottom and top clip hangers at rear, metal copper hinge clip top front, left and right bottom pop rivet hinges. Open box has metal shelf divider held in place w/2 pop rivets each side.
Appreciate this interesting Website.....Thanks
A.B. Neighbor

Margaret
APRIL 30, 2010 06:04 PM

In reply to by Arthur Neighbor

Arthur,

Without seeing a picture of the First Aid Kit, it's hard to tell, since we made these kits for many years. If you could email me a picture, I will try to track down a date for you. You can find a link to the blog's email on the "About the Author" page.

thanks,

Margaret

Geri Luongo
MAY 01, 2010 03:20 AM

Hi: Can you tell me about a Ready Adhesive Bandage Band Aid Emergency Dressing J&J tin. PAT Dec. 28, 1926 3 1/2" w x 3 1/4" H x 1/2" thick. Inside there are visual instructions for applying the protective dressing for minor cuts, burns, and abrasions.
It has a orange/red small checker pattern border on the top face with BAND - AID across on a diagnel and a red cross toward the lower right. It has scratches and and shows wear and pitting but over-all the metal is intact and solid no rust. Is there any value?
Thank you
Geri

Margaret
MAY 03, 2010 04:42 PM

In reply to by Geri Luongo

Hi Geri,

I have a BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandage tin that's very similar right here in front of me! The original BAND-AID® Brand boxes in 1921 were cardboard, and they were produced in metal after that. Initially the adhesive bandages were not pre-cut, as they are today, and we printed instructions on how to cut the width needed and apply it on the inside cover. Because BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandages were the first pre-made commercial dressings for small wounds that consumers could apply themselves, it was a very new concept for consumers, so we included the visual instructions on how to use them. As soon as Johnson & Johnson built machinery to make them pre-cut, they were no longer in square containers and were in the more familiar-shaped tins. So you have a collectible from the early days of the product! I don't know what the actual worth of your tin is, but you can check online auction sites to compare, or check in with a local antiques dealer.

Regards,

Margaret

William Berg
MAY 15, 2010 05:09 PM

Margaret -

I have acquired an antique J&J product called Menthodona Plaster.
It comes in a silver metal tube with a painting of a man and woman dressed in colonial attire.

The product description document which was inside the tube describes the plaster product as curing everything from Rheumatism, Asthma, Pneumonia, Heart Disease, Cramps, Cholera and many other diseases.
There obviously was no FDA around in those days.

Do you have any record of this product and the years it was sold by J&J?

Margaret
MAY 17, 2010 06:16 PM

In reply to by William Berg

William,

I'm still looking for information on your Menthodona Plaster. We have one in our Museum, but I'm still searching in our archives to see if I can find any information on it. Based on the name, it sounds as if its active ingredients were menthol and belladonna, two common medicated plaster ingredients. Both of them would have provided pain relief, the menthol likely providing heat/pain relief. In many cases when plasters had a combination of ingredients, the name was derived from combining the names of the two main medicinal ingredients -- for instance, Bellcapsic plasters (a popular 19th century plaster) contained belladonna and capsicum (the active ingredient in hot peppers) and would have provided pain relief and heat/pain relief too. As soon as I find out anything more about your Menthadona plaster, I will post it in the comments section of this post. I can say that it's one of our more rare historical products -- I haven't seen many of them at all around.

Regards,

Margaret

William Berg
JUNE 02, 2010 03:07 PM

Hi Margaret -
Some time ago I acquired a one pound box of Johnson & Johnson Oakum.
The product was still in the original cardboard box with the Johnson & Johnson logo.

Can you tell me what this product was used for, and approximately which years was it sold?

Thanks.

William Berg

Margaret
JUNE 02, 2010 05:46 PM

Hi William,

Oakum was used as a hospital surgical dressing material. It's listed in our first price list from 1887, so we made it from the very beginning. We still made it in 1924, and I'm still checking for an end date. I will reply with what I find out in the comments section for this post.

Regards,

Margaret

Jenny
JULY 01, 2010 03:45 PM

We recently moved into a new home where there were old metel cabinets. We removed the cabinets and I was looking under them to find a manufacturer and I found a small bottle hiddeb on the rails. The bottle reads 1/8 fluid ounce METHAPHEN and is made by Johnson and Johnson. Would you know what year this was made? Thanks for your time!

Margaret
JULY 02, 2010 12:40 PM

In reply to by Jenny

Hi Jenny,

I did a quick search through our historical price lists and haven't been able to locate the product in our price lists. A quick google search on the name brings up the fact that it was a germicide, used to kill germs. Here's a reference from 1927: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2531422/pdf/postmedj00869-0001b.pdf

I will need to do some more research. If you could send me a picture of your bottle through the blog's email (there's a link to my email on the "About the Author" page), it might help me find some more information about it for you.

Regards,

Margaret

John Carmola
JULY 05, 2010 05:28 PM

In the book Industrial minerals & rocks: commodities, markets, and uses, by Jessica Elzea Kogel; et al, 7th edition, 2006, p.971:
Johnson's baby powder was introduced in the 1880s based on imported Italian powder. Commercial production began in 1904 near Johnson.
Could you tell me if this is correct (the second sentence)?
Thank you.

Margaret
JULY 06, 2010 09:56 AM

In reply to by john carmola

Hi John,
JOHNSON'S® Baby Powder was introduced in 1893 and first went on the market in 1894. It was originally Italian talc. In the 1890s, all of our manufacturing was done in New Brunswick, New Jersey (where our World Headquarters is still located!), so JOHNSON'S® Baby Powder was originally manufactured in New Brunswick. Here's a post about how it was invented, which was the result of close communication with doctors and consumers: http://www.kilmerhouse.com/?p=122

Best Regards,

Margaret

John Carmola
JULY 06, 2010 09:16 PM

Margaret,
Thank you for your prompt response.
Although it was manufactured in NJ, might the raw talc have come from Vermont as noted in the article I quoted?
John

Margaret
JULY 07, 2010 09:59 AM

In reply to by john carmola

John,

I looked it up and the talc did come from Vermont, at least for part of the history of the product.

Regards,

Margaret

John Carmola
JULY 06, 2010 09:20 PM

Margaret,
And now I note that I failed to give the complete quote. It should read "...Johnson, VT."
Thanks.
John

John Carmola
JULY 07, 2010 10:07 AM

Margaret,
One more question, please.
Do you know the dates it came from VT?
Thank you, again.
John

Margaret
JULY 07, 2010 05:12 PM

In reply to by john carmola

John,

I don't have any information on the dates, unfortunately.

Margaret

John Carmola
JULY 09, 2010 08:45 AM

Margaret,
Thank you for looking.
I hope you'll keep me in mind, so that if you ever come across the dates, or the source of the first talc used, I'd very much appreciate it.
John

Shannon
JULY 10, 2010 08:25 AM

Hi Margaret
I bought a large original drawing from a fellow who stated he worked at Johnson and Johnson in Montreal in the 60's as a sales rep. He said the painting was commissioned by a Montreal artist for the packaging for Chix diapers. It is not signed but is an incredible rendition of a baby with a teddy bear. It's difficult to tell if the baby is male or female but sooooo cute!! I would love to know who the artist is as I collect vintage prints and originals of babies (if I can find them.)Could I send you a picture of the picture and take the chance this story is true? Maybe it nevr was used on the packaging but it may be reported in the archives somewhere in the 60's or 70's.

Thanks so much, Shannon

Margaret
JULY 12, 2010 10:16 AM

In reply to by Shannon

Hi Shannon,

The drawing sounds wonderful from your description! Please feel free to send me a picture of it through the blog's email, and I will try to track down some information about it for you. The blog's email is: KilmerHouse@its.jnj.com.

Regards,

Margaret

Chris
AUGUST 08, 2010 09:50 PM

Hello,

Maybe you can help me. I recently came into possession of my Great Grandfathers homemade telescope. He made an eyepiece from a Johnson & Johnson 1 1/2 inch by 5 yard "ZO" Adhesive Plaster cartridge spool. It's a black tin with brownish areas and red outlines were the writing is. I'm trying to figure out how old the telescope may be. If possible, any information on the year (or years) this type of adhesive plaster cartridge was used would be helpful.

Thank you,
-Chris

Margaret
AUGUST 09, 2010 03:38 PM

In reply to by Chris

Hi Chris,

What a great family heirloom! Your great grandfather sounds like he was really inventive, to use a ZONAS® adhesive plaster spool to make an eyepiece for his telescope. I will need to do some checking in our archives to come up with a range of dates for you, which will take a few days. I will post my answer to you in the comments section of the blog, so please check back in a few days.

Thanks,

Margaret

Chris
AUGUST 09, 2010 08:51 PM

Thanks Margaret,

This info may help narrow things done for you...He died in 1936 so it obviously has to be before then. We have a picture of him with the telescope and i'm guessing it was taken sometime in the 1920's or possibly even earlier.

-Chris

Carolyn
AUGUST 26, 2010 12:34 PM

Hi, I just found a J&J Products hinged door first aid wall cabinet with 3 removable drawers. The drawers are black with a small gold colored drawer ring pull and with gold writing listing the drawers' contents. The cabinet measures 16" x 11" x 7" high. The exterior of the metal cabinet appears to have been black but is now painted silver (black paint shows through where the cabinet has been scratched). There are two packages of Mine Safety Appliances Co. compresses in the box, so perhaps the box was painted silver so it could be seen in a mine. I would be very interested in learning more about this box. Thanks! Carolyn

Margaret
AUGUST 26, 2010 04:25 PM

In reply to by Carolyn

Hi Carolyn,

Without a photo, I can't know exactly which model First Aid kit you have, but you definitely have a vintage Johnson & Johnson First Aid Kit. As you can see from your kit, the original color of the kit was black, and it would have had gold and red lettering. Your kit was designed for use at a business or industry, and since yours contained compress dressings relating to mine safety, yours likely was used in a mine. I don't know whether that explains the silver paint, but your explanation sounds like a logical one to me! The kits were designed to be refilled. The larger kits (such as the First Aid Cabinet No. 1 or the Insurance First Aid Cabinet) were designed to hold a wide variety of first aid materials. We also made smaller, more specialized kits as well. Johnson & Johnson made the first ever First Aid kits in 1891. The earliest kits were designed to treat injuries to workers laying cross country railroad track in the U.S. Soon after, states passed laws that all industries and public buildings had to have a First Aid Kit. Johnson & Johnson also researched First Aid best practices and in 1901 came out with the first ever First Aid manuals, which were packaged with the kits. Here's a post about the origin of First Aid Kits:
http://www.kilmerhouse.com/?p=129

Best Regards,

Margaret

Ed
AUGUST 27, 2010 04:44 PM

Hi - I have a J&J AEROKIT. It is a black tin hinged container with red and gold lettering. I'm sure it was my uncles' who worked for National Air Transport and then United Air Lines. It has never been used and has all the items in it. The liquid containers of course have dried up. There is no number or date on the container or in the various directions within it.

Margaret
AUGUST 27, 2010 05:32 PM

In reply to by Ed

Ed,

Your Aerokit sounds like a wonderful memento of your uncle. The Johnson & Johnson Aerokit was a first aid kit specifically designed for airplanes. It first appeared in our 1933 price list, and was designed to be small and lightweight, due to size and weight limits on airplanes. The early Aerokits were black with red and gold lettering on the front. It is amazing that yours still has the contents. Johnson & Johnson made the first ever first aid kits in 1890/1891. The original kits were for the railroads, but we soon made kits for businesses, industries and homes. When automobiles and airplanes came into use, we made first aid kits for those as well.

Best Regards,

Margaret

Ed
AUGUST 28, 2010 06:47 AM

Thank You for the information on the Aero Kit. Do you have any idea what it might be worth? I'm at that point in life where we are starting to declutter.

Margaret
AUGUST 30, 2010 01:23 PM

In reply to by Ed

Hi Ed,

I don't have any information on what your Aerokit might be worth, but you can try searching through online auction sites. Historic Johnson & Johnson First Aid Kits frequently turn up on these sites, and that may give you an idea of potential value. This blog also has a reader who was looking for a vintage Aerokit, so if he's reading, he may be interested in your Aerokit.

Margaret

Mark Stewart
AUGUST 30, 2010 06:29 PM

Hello Ed,
I am Mark Stewart in Erie, PA and I would be very interested in purchasing your Aerokit for my 1936 J-2 Piper Cub airplane. Please call me at 908-246-0585 or email stewartmw@aol.com
Thanks
Mark

Chris
SEPTEMBER 11, 2010 11:47 AM

Hello Margaret,

A few weeks ago I sent some pictures of my great grandfathers J&J Adhesive Plaster eyepiece, i was just wondering if you got them?

-Chris

Margaret
SEPTEMBER 11, 2010 04:05 PM

In reply to by Chris

Hi Chris,

I did get the pictures. Your great grandfather was really ingenious to make an eyepiece out of one of our Adhesive Plaster tins. I have done some looking in our archives but have not yet found an exact match in terms of dates. As soon as I do, I will post the information on the blog for you to see, so please keep checking back.

Thanks,

Margaret

Sandra
SEPTEMBER 15, 2010 11:30 AM

Hi Margaret,
My husband bought a 1937 Ford couple years ago. The car came out of a farmers field and is currently being restored. It probaby was their since the 40's. In the car was a very old J & J waterproof Band Aid tin. blue and cream in color and it was made in canada. the towp of the tin states to open press sides of box and slide cover. Would you be able to tell me how old this tin is. the tin is full of band aids. Also on the tin it says Plain Pad. thanks

Margaret
SEPTEMBER 16, 2010 05:28 PM

In reply to by Sandra

Sandra,

Without seeing a photograph, it would be difficult to tell. Is it a flat square tin or an upright rectangular tin? If you can send me a picture through the blog's email, that would be helpful in identifying your BAND-AID ® Brand Adhesive Bandages tin. The blog's email address is kilmerhouse@its.jnj.com.

Thanks,

Margaret